Polynesian Continues to Drive Direct Sales in May 2017

Sales for Copper Creek Villas & Cabins at Disney's Wilderness Lodge started in March 2017 but Disney's Polynesian Villas & Bungalows continues to outsell the newest Disney Vacation Club resort by better than four to one.

Polynesian Villas

 

In the last 12 months, Disney has sold 1,956,298 points for the DVC resorts located at Walt Disney World, an average of 163,025 points a month. With the introduction of Copper Creek, sales are trending upward, improving 24.2% to 202,449 points a month over the last three months.  However, Copper Creek represents only a small portion of the total sales with 34,269 points sold in May 2017 compared to 150,335 at the Polynesian Villas.

Copper Creek Villas & Cabins at Disney’s Wilderness Lodge — The first deeds for Copper Creek were recorded beginning April 14, 2017, and 362 deeds containing 51,675 points were sold for the month. In May 2017, sales for the newest DVC resort dropped to 218 deeds and 34,269 points. By comparison, the Polynesian’s sales climbed from 13,148 points to 61,050 points in its first two calendar months and the Villas at Disney’s Grand Floridian jumped from 85,994 points to 226,439 points by its second month of sales.

Included in May’s sales for Copper Creek were three Fixed Week deeds. So far, six Fixed Week deeds have been sold for the resort: Five for studios with walk-in shower and one for a one-bedroom villa.

Disney has declared 48 of Copper Creek’s 184 vacation homes for the DVC inventory. In terms of points, the 48 declared vacation homes account for about 1,021,430 (30.7%) of the resort’s 3,321,966 points. As Disney sells more points for Copper Creek, it will declare more vacation homes for the DVC inventory.

Disney’s Polynesian Villas & Bungalows — Sales for the Polynesian have not suffered despite it having to share the marketing spotlight with Copper Creek. In May 2017, the Polynesian sold 150,335 points, slightly more than the 148,219 points a month the resort has averaged in 2017 and well above the 109,654 points it has averaged in its 28-month history.

Disney has sold about 76.3% of the Polynesian’s total points and has about 875,000 points left to sell to the general public. In the past, Disney has considered a resort to the “sold out” when 92% to 95% of the resort has been sold and the Polynesian should reach that status in the next four or five months.

DVC Direct Sales - May 2017

On May 22, 2017, Disney declared 32 more studios at the Polynesian for the DVC inventory. Including this latest declaration, 16 bungalows and 344 studios have now been added to the DVC inventory. This accounts for 3,778,448 points, or 93.7% of the Polynesian’s 4,032,720 total points. There are four bungalows and 16 studios that have not yet been declared for the DVC inventory.

Aulani, Disney Vacation Club Villas — Sales data for Aulani is only available through February 2017. In February, 22,979 points were sold, marking the fourth consecutive month that Aulani sales have failed to break 30,000 points. February’s point total is the fewest number of points sold in a month since we started tracking Aulani sales in May 2014.

The sales data includes all nine DVC resorts at Walt Disney World, as well as Disney's Vero Beach Resort, Disney's Hilton Head Island Resort, and Aulani, a Disney Resort and Spa. Point sales data is not available for the Villas at Disney's Grand Californian Hotel. The data is compiled from deeds filed by Disney Vacation Development and recorded with the Orange County (FL) Comptroller, the Indian River County (FL) Clerk of Court, the Beaufort County (SC) Register of Deeds, and the Hawaii Bureau of Conveyances.

Thanks to Imdizfan for helping compile sales data!


Wil Lovato is a contributor to DVCNews.com and has been a Disney Vacation Club owner since 2009. His DVC Home Resorts include Bay Lake Tower, Animal Kingdom Villas, and Aulani. He can be found posting on many Disney discussion forums under the username of “wdrl.”

Reader Comments
Re: Polynesian Continues to Drive Direct Sales in May 2017 -- wdrl
2017 Jun 14 10:12:15 PM
I admit I'm surprised at how slow Copper Creek sales have been. Copper Creek studios are slightly cheaper than the Polynesian studios, and it offers a wider variety of accommodations than the Poly. I know sales incentives are better for the Polynesian Villas & Bungalows than for Copper Creek for purchases of 125 points or more, but they are priced exactly the same for purchases under 125 points.

Perhaps the difference in maintenance fees -- $7.33 for Copper Creek vs. $6.14 for the Poly -- makes the Poly much more attractive to new buyers.
Re: Polynesian Continues to Drive Direct Sales in May 2017 -- rkstocke5609
2017 Jun 15 08:57:27 PM
I am surprised also. I imagine it will pick up once the new pool opens and further details emerge about an anticipated community hall which Poly lacks. It will be interesting to watch unfold..
Re: Polynesian Continues to Drive Direct Sales in May 2017 -- Dlandmom
2017 Jun 15 10:28:19 PM
wdrl wrote:
I admit I'm surprised at how slow Copper Creek sales have been. Copper Creek studios are slightly cheaper than the Polynesian studios, and it offers a wider variety of accommodations than the Poly. I know sales incentives are better for the Polynesian Villas & Bungalows than for Copper Creek for purchases of 125 points or more, but they are priced exactly the same for purchases under 125 points.

Perhaps the difference in maintenance fees -- $7.33 for Copper Creek vs. $6.14 for the Poly -- makes the Poly much more attractive to new buyers.

I was just looking at the current fees yesterday and was surprised to see Copper Creek so high. I may have missed the info if it was posted already, but do we know why it's starting so high (relatively)?
Re: Polynesian Continues to Drive Direct Sales in May 2017 -- wdrl
2017 Jun 16 08:11:42 AM
Dlandmom wrote:
I was just looking at the current fees yesterday and was surprised to see Copper Creek so high. I may have missed the info if it was posted already, but do we know why it's starting so high (relatively)?
When you look at a breakout of the dues, you'll notice that Copper Creek has the highest ad valorem taxes and the highest capital reserves budget of any of the DVC resorts at Walt Disney World.

CCV's taxes are $1.8539 per point. The next nearest DVC resort is Bay Lake Tower at 1.6006, a difference of $0.2533 per point. There is a chance that Disney has overestimated the taxes for CCV -- its happened at the Poly for the last two years -- in which case CCV owners will get a credit on their annual dues. But at this point in time Disney has reason to believe that when the final tax bill comes due in November 2017 it will be relatively high for CCV.

CCV's capital reserves budget is $1.1590 per point. The next nearest resort is Old Key West at $1.0435, a difference of $0.1135. My unscientific guess is that the 26 lakeside cabins will require more frequent maintenance and upkeep (new roofs, new siding) over the years, much more than required to maintain villas that are in a single building, such as Boulder Ridge, whose capital reserves budget is $0.9855 per point.

The third major component of DVC annual dues is the operating budget, which covers budget line items such as housekeeping, maintenance, transportation, and front desk. Once again, CCV has the highest operating budget ($4.5043) of any WDW resort, but only by a meager $0.0233 per point. However, that difference is a bit misleading because the DVC resort in second place is Animal Kingdom Villas, whose operating budget is inflated by $0.3386 by its Animal Program. In third place among resorts is CCV's sister Boulder Ridge Villas, whose operating budget is $4.4406, only $0.0637 less than CCV. So, CCV's operating budget doesn't really seem to be out of line, but at the same time its at the high end of the spectrum.

Taken collectively, these items all place Copper Creek at the high end when it comes to maintenance fees.
Re: Polynesian Continues to Drive Direct Sales in May 2017 -- Dlandmom
2017 Jun 16 01:24:41 PM
wdrl wrote:
When you look at a breakout of the dues, you'll notice that Copper Creek has the highest ad valorem taxes and the highest capital reserves budget of any of the DVC resorts at Walt Disney World.

CCV's taxes are $1.8539 per point. The next nearest DVC resort is Bay Lake Tower at 1.6006, a difference of $0.2533 per point. There is a chance that Disney has overestimated the taxes for CCV -- its happened at the Poly for the last two years -- in which case CCV owners will get a credit on their annual dues. But at this point in time Disney has reason to believe that when the final tax bill comes due in November 2017 it will be relatively high for CCV.

CCV's capital reserves budget is $1.1590 per point. The next nearest resort is Old Key West at $1.0435, a difference of $0.1135. My unscientific guess is that the 26 lakeside cabins will require more frequent maintenance and upkeep (new roofs, new siding) over the years, much more than required to maintain villas that are in a single building, such as Boulder Ridge, whose capital reserves budget is $0.9855 per point.

The third major component of DVC annual dues is the operating budget, which covers budget line items such as housekeeping, maintenance, transportation, and front desk. Once again, CCV has the highest operating budget ($4.5043) of any WDW resort, but only by a meager $0.0233 per point. However, that difference is a bit misleading because the DVC resort in second place is Animal Kingdom Villas, whose operating budget is inflated by $0.3386 by its Animal Program. In third place among resorts is CCV's sister Boulder Ridge Villas, whose operating budget is $4.4406, only $0.0637 less than CCV. So, CCV's operating budget doesn't really seem to be out of line, but at the same time its at the high end of the spectrum.

Taken collectively, these items all place Copper Creek at the high end when it comes to maintenance fees.

Maintenance fees do concern me when I look at purchasing more points. I do worry about operating budgets and upkeep and how that impacts the future of fees at different locations. That plus all the recent news about Disney having to fight property taxes every year makes me start thinking more about adding points at say SSR or BLT where I think future upkeep may grow slower than at other resorts...even though I don't have a huge desire to stay at either property. I'd have to balance lower buy in price and fees with the inability to book at my preferred resort at 11 months. In the big scheme of things though, paying $100 more a year on a 100 point contract isn't a make or break thing, but psychologically it's a hurdle!

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