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Thread: Is Aulani Threatened by the Ongoing Volcanic Activity?

  1. #1
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    Default Is Aulani Threatened by the Ongoing Volcanic Activity?

    Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano has been very active the past few weeks, spewing lava from multiple fissures, shooting ash over 10,000 feet in the air, and generating thousands of earthquakes. Dozens of homes and businesses have been damaged and some roads are impassible due to lava flows and cracks in the ground.

    Should I be worried if I have an upcoming trip to Aulani, Disney Vacation Club Villas?



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  2. #2
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    While we were in Hawaii, there were two questions many people were asking about Kilauea's volcanic activity.

    "How long will the volcanic activity continue?" No one knows for sure. Kilauea has erupted 34 times since 1952 and the current eruption has been going on since January 1983. Most of the time the eruptive activity is in areas that don't pose threats to homes or businesses, or doesn't produce spectacular images that would interest the general public. I doubt Kilauea will cease all activity anytime soon, but hopefully, within the next few weeks, the activity will withdraw from areas and will not pose risks to residents.

    Another recurring question is "Why would anyone live next to an active volcano?" The Puna District of the Big Island, where the fissures and lava flows are occurring, is one of the cheapest places to live in Hawaii. Land is cheap and there is room for small farms. Compared to a place like Maui, housing is affordable for the average person. People live in places like Oklahoma (tornados), San Francisco (earthquakes), and Miami (hurricanes) despite the risks from natural disasters, so I suppose living next to a volcano is not all that unusual.






  3. #3
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    I checked for the last time Oahu had vog and it was in 2012 for around 3 days. It did not affect the entire island the same way, but the eastern side was more affect. Despite the vog the air quality was still in the green or healthy levels. Here is a current map showing vog conditions in Hawaii.

    As you can see in this map from purpleair.com the air quality is only affecting the areas near the lava flows and the Kilauea volcano itself. The rest of the Big Island of Hawaii, Maui, Oahu and Kaua'i are green with very low numbers. If you look at mainland U.S.A. you will see many more areas of pollution as high as those on the Big Island. I have pretty severe asthma problems and my doctor wouldn't have any qualms of me visiting Oahu.
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    Last edited by denlo; 05-23-2018 at 08:59 AM.
    --Denise

    Scheduled upcoming Disney trips:

    11/27-12/14/18 AKV Kidani Village
    2/19-2/22/19 - Bay Lake Tower
    3/10-3/14/19 - AKV Jambo House


  4. #4
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    Here is a great video of the current eruptions in the East Lower Rift zone. This area is about 20 miles from the Kilauea crater.

    https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vsc/movies/movie_173958.html
    --Denise

    Scheduled upcoming Disney trips:

    11/27-12/14/18 AKV Kidani Village
    2/19-2/22/19 - Bay Lake Tower
    3/10-3/14/19 - AKV Jambo House


  5. #5
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    I've been reading many of the news reports about the volcanic activity on the Big Island. To be sure, many of the reports, along with their accompanying photos and videos, are very dramatic.

    But one thing that is overlooked in many of these reports is how the current volcanic activity is limited to a very small part of the Big Island. Here is a map from the USGS' Hawaii Volcano Observatory dated May 23, 2018, showing the extent of the lava flows and fissures. Looking at the map, you can see activity since May 3, 2018, covers a wide area in the Puna District of the Big Island. However, if you look at the insert in the lower right corner of the map, you can see the map covers only a very small corner on the southeastern end of the Big Island.

    image-442.jpg






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