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Thread: DVCNews Debates: Why are People Buying?

  1. #1
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    Default DVCNews Debates: Why are People Buying?

    2017 yielded some of the best sales numbers for Disney Vacation Club in years. Points continue to sell at an impressive pace for all-time-high prices. But exactly what is prompting buyers to continue to shell-out nearly $180 per point? Is it the appeal of resorts like the Polynesian and Copper Creek? Impressive owner perks like Moonlight Magic, the Epcot Lounge and theme park ticket discounts? Is it merely a reflection of a healthy economy?



    Topic: Which factor(s) are primarily responsible for strong DVC direct sales numbers?

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  2. #2
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    I believe that the current economy has something to do with it , and the perks are certainly a plus, However, I I think the overall positive opinion of existing owners has a lot to do with it. Not only do current owners have a good opinion, but they seem willing to openly share those opinions with complete strangers, particularly while in the bubble. When we feel good about what we have , others want it too!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: DVCNews Debates: Why are People Buying?

    I agree that current owners are really good representatives for DVC and probably do as much to sell new owners as the advertising and tours do.
    We just returned from a Disney Cruise and I realized that I talked to lots of people at the DVC desk about how much we enjoy our DVC membership. I don't know if any if them purchased points, but they were happy to hear about our experiences.

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    In society today everyone is use to scheduling. Most companies today provide tech for 24 hour access to their employees. People are use to running from jobs to gyms to friends and family events - adding children to that mix involves more planning with school, athletics and clubs, play dates and camps/day care to accommodate the working adults schedule. For this WDW provides a nice mix of fun, relaxation and accommodating people who are used to scheduling, being scheduled, being accessible and being in control enough to be able to relax a bit. I use to say that a WDW vacation required enough planning that I would feel a busy day earned me the right to relax at night. Plus it's fairly 'clean' both environmentally and socially - barring the occasional late night imbiber and miscellaneous unplanned wild life interaction.

    Today's working adults is use to the high dollar item - new phones, weekly food shopping, shoes/closthing are hundreds of dollars with insurances and mortgages in the thousands monthly. Compared to daily ordinary expenses the cost of DVC membership is inline. Those of use who remember mortgage payments and food shopping being in the hundreds are shocked at the cost of present day DVC memberships. Then again I just replaced my 10 year old car and my insurance costs doubled for the same coverage. Life is expensive whether you play or work and today young adult has gotten the message while those of us who are looking at retirement are still pretending we can exist on a 90's income.
    Last edited by bakerworld; 02-26-2018 at 09:22 AM. Reason: spelling

    Janet & Dan


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    I never believed in living beyond my means, always had a "what if" plan, and planned for a long and financially secure retirement. I still sacrifice today for tomorrow. If my company didn't give my a Smartphone, I'd still have a flip phone with a TracFone I JUST replaced my 27 in Panasonic CRT - only TV in the house - with a clearance model Samsung for $350.00. The vehicle I drive to work everyday is 15 years old.

    That's not to say we don't have nice things, but the things we have were never knee jerk reactions or keeping up with the Jone's. We also aren't homebodies. This year, we will spend at least 80 days away from home and we can do this now because we laid the foundation years ago.

    Today, it seems young couple live only for today, must have all the latest and greatest toys and are comfortable living pay check to pay check, buried in debt. Many of these kids grew up with wonderful Disney trips and now want to live the Magic as an adult and adding a DVC Mortgage to the list is just one more monthly payment.

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    I can recall when direct prices broke the $100 per point barrier, many Disney veterans thought the price too high to sustain interest in DVC. As long as people are fascinated by Disney Parks and as long as they believe owning DVC saves them a few dollars over Disney hotel rates, there won't be any shortage of buyers.

  7. #7
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    Default Demographics changes?

    I suspect most traditional buyers of DVC are in Florida and/or the South East. That's great - but DVC has now opened up to northeast and west coast buyers, where middle class family income is in the $125K-$400K/yr range. You also have foreign buyers who are able to take advantage of weakness in the dollar over the last decade. Both of these groups can support prices up to $200/point. Is that still a good deal? Debatable....but it's their decision.

    At least, the above is my explanation....I'd love to see if it is backed up in the sales numbers. DVC opening up Aulani, and various short west coast voyages by Disney Cruise Lines, made DVC much more attractive for my family in San Diego - although we purchased in 2013 with a discount for bulk Aulani points(effective ~$119/pt). We take rare trips to WDW, but prefer Aulani, Hilton Head, or the various Disney Concierge locations. Visiting Lake Tahoe in a few weeks using DVC points. Gave a 4 day stay in Maui using DVC points to a niece earlier in the year. We did rent to a friend one year for $14/point. And, I suspect if we ever sell our points, we'll get back more than the purchase price. The only concern we really have is escalation of maintenance costs and taxes at Aulani. We paid about $2,600 this year which still is likely a value verse what we would have paid in cash for rooms but our complete ROI on DVC isn't short...maybe 2025.

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    I can only say that for us it was all about the uniqueness of the property and that we do travel at peak periods so home resort is critical. We started with Bay Lake Tower because we love being at the Contemporary and walking (sometimes running!) just to go see the fireworks if we felt like it. Then we grabbed some points at Boardwalk since we love the festivals and used to love the Osborne lights... We bought just enough to get a two bedroom for a week(ish) at Thanksgiving every three years. On a cruise, enjoying tropical breezes (and beverages!!!) and falling under the hypnotic spell of the sales rep, we thought Polynesian Bungalows would give us that same cruisy feeling and we bought enough for 3 weekdays in October. OOPS! Had to add to make that 3 nights at July 4th but again - every three years. When news of the CC cabins broke out and we were on the monorail passing the beginning of clearing the land, I jokingly told my husband "If they put a hot tub and a fireplace on a screened in porch I'd have to get points there!" "HAHAHA" we said. It's Florida! OOPS! So we had to get enough points to enjoy this at Thanksgiving or Christmas, again 3 nights, again every 3 years. Being able to bank and borrow make that easy. The "kids" are no longer kids, both in college next year. They only have a few days at major holidays, they're looking for space and relaxing so being in a villa is the only way to go for us now.
    We are completely smitten with Disney and foolish. Financially we really shouldn't have done the Poly and Copper Creek as I would have to live to 108 to cover the contract but I figured 4 or 5 visits (12 - 15 years) if I'm lucky healthwise and maybe more so hey! Wishing we were young....and wealthy! Who knows what's to come!
    Enjoying my adventure

  9. #9
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    It’s all about financial responsibility. I know too many people that scrimped and saved for their entire lives and either didn’t make it to a happy retirement or were to weak/Ill to enjoy it. You can’t take it with you. Doesn’t mean blow it all and take on a lot of debt but saving for 10 years to pay cash for something isn’t always the right answer. Life is too short to miss out on some luxury’s. Again its what you can afford and what personal value you place the purchase at not just the face value.
    Some people place different values on different things. When I talk to some they think DVC is a waste of money then drive away in an 80k truck. Different things for different people.
    When interest rates are so low why not borrow the money to get something you place high value on. The book value on DVC might be set; but different people will place a higher value on it and willing to pay more for it by adding in the cost of interest.

    Weve been owners for 7 years now. Did Some quick online calculations based on DVC cost and cdn dollar when we bought vs now is staggering. Based on our purchase price I could have taken a 7 year loan at 30% interest and I would still be ahead vs what costs are for direct today and cdn conversion. Instead we took a loan, payed it off and have enjoyed several years of incredible family vacations that we would have otherwise missed out on. We’ve done 7 Disney trips and 3 Aulani trips and our kids are both under 6. For us that debt is priceless.

    What would be interesting to know is at one point does DVC consider it a sale. I believe there is a 10 day buyers remorse? Is that sale already counted in the total sales numbers? I’m sure there are a few that impulse buy and regret when they get home.

    To answer the question I think there are some people who get caught up and buy when they shouldn’t but there are many people out there with busy lifestyles and DVC almost forces you to vacation. For those that place high value on family time are willing to splurge a little extra on DVC.
    WDW - POFQ, CS, ASM, BLT, OKW, VWL, AKL - (9 trips)
    DL - 4 trips
    DCL - 2 cruises
    Aulani - 3 trips




  10. #10
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    Thanks for all the great feedback!

    FWIW, I intended this to be more of a "why are people buying NOW" question. Many of the factors posted have been in existence for years: impulse buy, love Disney, love the property, good feedback from owners, etc. Despite that, why is it that they sold far more points in 2017 than any time in the past 5-6 years?

    I'm inclined to think the member perks have a lot to do with it. People love "exclusive" things like the Epcot lounge, TOTWL and Moonlight Magic. Members had great ticket offers thru much of 2017. This year the dining discounts are impressive.

    Individually, the financial value of these perks doesn't do much to close the price gap with a resale buy. However, I think the mere existence of these perks has made it easier for DVC salespeople to "close the deal" during the first point of contact rather than giving buyers a chance to ponder the purchase, research & discover resale, etc.

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